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20 Jan

Martin Luther King Day

“Come, Let Us Dream”

Article

TITLE: "Come, Let Us Dream"
AUTHOR: John Middleton
TUNE: O WALY WALY
COMPOSER: English folk melody
SOURCE: Worship & Song, no. 3157
"Come, Let Us Dream" is the second hymn text by retired United Methodist pastor John Middleton. It came as an extension of his first hymn, "Beloved Child, Beloved Community," which was an exploration of personal and corporate experiences of belovedness in the writings of Henry Nouwen and Martin Luther King, Jr. The fifth stanza of that first hymn was inspired by the writings of Martin Luther King, Jr. on the subject. "Come, Let Us Dream" explores that idea more fully.

“Come, Let Us Dream” »

A Call to Justice and Mercy

Liturgy

The Lord calls us, Church,
Hear the cry of the oppressed! 

A Call to Justice and Mercy »

“I Have a Dream”

Article

The hymn's title, "I Have a Dream," derives from Martin Luther King, Jr.'s famous speech delivered to over 200,000 civil rights supporters on August 28, 1963, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. 

“I Have a Dream” »

Helps for Celebrating Martin Luther King’s Birthday

Article

Your church or community may be planning to give special attention to observing Martin Luther King's birthday in worship.  

Helps for Celebrating Martin Luther King’s Birthday »

Let Us Speak of Mercy and Justice

Article

We are indebted to the Rev. Brett Strobel for writing these calls to worship and for compiling relevant resources for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.  

Let Us Speak of Mercy and Justice »

Remembering the Dream

Liturgy

We give you thanks, Holy God, for the saints who have borne witness to your Word throughout the ages. We give special thanks for your servant Martin Luther King, Jr., who responded to your voice to serve and gave his life for the cause of love and justice in our land.

Remembering the Dream »

Celebrating the Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Article

This worship service was celebrated on January 17, 2007, at the Wightman Chapel of the Scarritt-Bennett Center in Nashville, Tennessee. The Center for Worship Resourcing posts it here so that churches and communities who may want to adapt it for use in their settings will have the benefit of this powerful recollection of the voice of Dr. King.  

Celebrating the Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. »

In Celebration of Martin Luther King Day, Creative Justice

Website

Where is justice to be found? Must we resign ourselves to the all-too-human patterns of oppression and murderous destruction? James Skillen, president of the Center for Public Justice in Washington D.C., answers that with a resounding, “No.”  

In Celebration of Martin Luther King Day, Creative Justice »

Resources for Observing Martin Luther King, Jr., Day

Article

Dr. King died at the hands of an assassin on April 4, 1968, a few months short of his fortieth birthday. Human history has forever been changed by the movement he headed. Our current level of sensitivity to human rights issues and inclusiveness can be traced to the strides gained by the Civil Rights Movements of the 1950's and 1960's. Martin Luther King, Jr., was a rare human being who sacrificed his life for a vision of equality for every person — not just African Americans. On November 2, 1983, both the Senate and the House of Representatives agreed that we should never forget Dr. King's contributions to the world: the third Monday in January was declared a national holiday.   

Resources for Observing Martin Luther King, Jr., Day »

Response to the Word: Martin Luther King, Jr., Day

Article

This response to the sermon was written for a Martin Luther King, Jr., Day celebration. It may, however, be adapted for general use. Two introductory statements are suggested. 

Response to the Word: Martin Luther King, Jr., Day »

The Making of a Prophet:  Celebrating the Life of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Article

Those born after 1968 did not hear the speeches of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., on the evening news; and many of us born before 1968 only recall them in the brief "sound bites" that are used in our yearly MLK celebrations. "The Making of a Prophet" provides an opportunity for both younger adults and older adults to hear and reflect upon several of the historic speeches that shook the foundations of America and forever changed how we live with one another.  

The Making of a Prophet:  Celebrating the Life of Martin Luther King, Jr. »

“Just Let Me Dream”: A Sermon Celebrating the Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Article

Martin tapped into the universal dream that all men and women have -- to be treated equally, fairly, with dignity and respect. His dream was your dream and my dream.  

“Just Let Me Dream”: A Sermon Celebrating the Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. »

Martin Luther King, Jr.‘s Favorite Hymn

Article

King's funeral took place on April 9, 1968, at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, the church where both King and his father had served as co-pastors. His good friend, singer Mahalia Jackson, sang "Precious Lord" at the funeral.  

Martin Luther King, Jr.‘s Favorite Hymn »